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Award Winning Safety

On March 19, 2014, Bruner Corporation was recognized by the Safety Council of Greater Columbus for safety achievement by receiving:SCGC_color-medium

  • 100% Award one year without a lost-time accident
  • Special Award – over a million hours without a lost-time accident! 

At the award banquet this year, former Buckeye Maurice Clarett spoke to the safety driven audience about perseverance and the power of change. His message was “It’s never too late to change the direction of your life.” With safety as such a critical component of the construction process, this program reminded the audience of how easy it is to be led astray. Work must be performed in a safe manner to eliminate injury and illness to our employees, our customers and their employees, and the public.

Bruner regards safety as an integral part of our culture and maintains an award winning safety program. We are proud to say that our firm is  consistently recognized for both safety achievement and safety innovation in the construction industry.

In addition to the awards listed above, Bruner also received a Safety Achievement award and a Safety Innovation award from the Builder’s Exchange of Central Ohio this year. The Safety Achievement award is for outstanding injury and illness statistics and the Safety Innovation award is for companies that have implemented unique and exciting practices to increase safety awareness or solve a particular safety challenge. 

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Banger Tool

For Bruner’s Innovation award, Mark Carlisle, Senior Project Manager, invented a tool that reduces strain on a worker while installing bangers. This tool stands 3.5 ft. tall and was used to install over 20,000 bangers on a new hospital tower.

By the old process, workers repeatedly bend over with their back hunched to physically hold the banger and use a hammer for attachment. The workers’ ergonomic risk is tremendous and often can result in pulling or straining back muscles from overuse. Fingers and hands are also at risk for laceration and crushed-by injuries.

This new tool allows the worker to perform the operation standing upright, and eliminates the need to physically hold the banger and use a hammer. The physical strength required to install the bangers is significantly less and the ergonomic strain, risk of pulled muscles and struck-by hazards are eliminated.

Before - After

Before                                                           After

Innovations such as these support Clarett’s message. There are always new and exciting innovations out there to heighten safety. Bruner is proud to a leader in this effort and will always look for more ways to provide a safer job site experience.

Strategic Project Management in a Construction World

The Columbus chapter of the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC) hosted Senior Project Manager, Evan Williams, at its August monthly meeting in German Village.

The meeting, held at Lindey’s, had great attendance and participation from NAWIC Columbus associates and other members of the A/E/C community. There were also quite a few Bruner guests in the crowd, in support of their friend and coworker, as Williams discussed strategic project management.

Throughout the presentation, he emphasized the importance of using strategy in the project management process and shared many insights on how to be successful from a project’s start to its finish. Williams explained that by focusing on strategy before the project, in what he calls the “Critical Strategic Zone,” it helps ensure success. Activities necessary during this zone include: conceptual analysis, engineering and design, site logistics planning, schedule development, pre-construction planning, early procurement, resource allocation and job cost setup.

Williams explained how having all of these steps completed and organized at the beginning of the project helps keep total project cost down—which always makes for a happy customer.  After all, knowing what will make the customer happy and providing it to them will really make you stand out from the crowd.

Williams emphasized the crucial power of communication between all members of the project team—even once the project and close-out activities are completed. He reminded the audience that the Project Manager’s final client impression occurs during the close-out activities. Past performance on jobs is one of the best sellers of potential new jobs. There were multiple questions and comments when the presentation was concluded, leaving the NAWIC members truly appreciative of all he had to share. For more information on the presentation, please leave a comment below or reach out to us via our website or social media channels.

NAWIC has been empowering women in the construction industry for over 50 years. Monthly meetings are held on the third Wednesday of every month at various restaurants in the Columbus area. Along with its monthly events, NAWIC Columbus believes in serving its community. NAWIC sponsors an annual scholarship supporting a student studying in a construction related field and do various other volunteer activities nationwide. Bruner Corporation is proud to be a partner of NAWIC and support this great organization. If you’re interested in becoming a member or contributor of NAWIC Columbus, please visit www.nawiccolumbus.org.

Is it Greener to Retrofit than Build New?

We all know that building new green buildings is always a hot idea, but experts have been pushing the idea that retrofitting existing buildings with green upgrades provide more environmental benefits. Your first thought may be new = better however, there is now proof that these experts are correct from a report released earlier this year. The report found that it is unequivocally greener to retrofit an old building than construct a new green building, no matter how many high-tech bells and whistles are in the new construction. The report was drawn from “The Greenest Building: Quantifying the Environmental Value of Building Reuse” project which was commissioned by Preservation Green Lab.

Elizabeth Heider, chair of the board of directors at the USGBC said “The thought was in order to build green you have to build new.” However, the report numbers add up in favor of retrofits. The report states:

  • It can take between 10 and 80 years for a new energy-efficient building to overcome, through more efficient operations, the negative climate change impacts that come from construction.
  • Environmental savings from re-use are between 4 and 46 percent over new construction when comparing buildings with the same energy performance level
  • The negative environmental impact of retro green for human health was between 12 and 38 percent less than for new construction
  • When it comes to ROIs, retros showed a 19.2% increase in ROI versus 9.9% for new buildings

Case in point, retrofitting is the way to go! Bruner has a successful track record of helping our customers retrofit their mechanical systems for over 50 years. Let us assist you in developing a retrofit solution that works best for your building by contacting us today!

12th Avenue Tunnel Project Completed!

As summer comes to an end, so does the construction on the OSU Wexner Medical Center 12th Avenue Tunnel project. Bruner was chosen to relocate the utility tunnel in order to provide high pressure steam and chilled water to the new Critical Cancer Tower along with distribution to other main hospitals on OSU’s Medical Center Campus. The new underground tunnel connects from the South Campus Chiller Plant and travels down Cannon Drive and up 12th Avenue to a main valve vault located at the corner of 12th Avenue and Harding Hospital. With the help of Bruner, this mechanical upgrade will result in greater efficiencies and savings in operational costs and energy in adjacent buildings.

Electrical, plumbing, and HVAC services were maintained throughout construction to major OSU buildings, and all piping systems were installed after the tunnel completion. So what was included you ask? For the chilled water piping there is: 1600 lineal ft of 36” and 900 lineal ft of 42” extra heavy carbon steel pipe, and 500 lineal ft of 24” pre-insulated underground piping. As for the high pressure steam and condensate piping: 1000 lineal ft of 12” seamless carbon steel piping and 1500 lineal feet of 8” and 6” stainless steel piping. Bruner manpower peaked at 20 pipefitters and welders at one time!

So the next time you are walking around Ohio State’s campus and find yourself on 12th Avenue, think about the hard work put in by Bruner to achieve efficiency and energy savings below you!

And the Award Goes To…

The BX Craftsmanship award judges met recently and selected nine individuals to be honored with a 2012 BX Craftsmanship award, and Bruner’s Doug Linnabary was one of the nine who received it! We would like to congratulate Doug and his team on the high-quality work that they performed on the Project Noble Data Center. Specific to the award, Doug was recognized for the installation of HVAC piping in the mechanical room and CRAH gallery at the Project Nobel Data Center.

Since 1964, the BX Craftsmanship Awards Program has recognized the importance of craftspeople for the quality work they provide to the local construction industry. The Craftsman recipients were selected from 29 nominations of work completed throughout the Central Ohio area during the past year.

We are proud of Doug, and expect his hard work and success to continue to be awarded in the future.

Fast Track Prefab for Scioto Downs Casino

The Scioto Downs Casino is a fast track project. The construction of the building must be concluded in six months, with all HVAC and plumbing finished in months two and three of the project.

Bruner Corporation has performed many fast track jobs in the past, but not as short as this. In order to accomplish this task, prefabrication was a necessity. Bruner developed an aggressive plan that entailed the prefabrication of all ductwork and plumbing fixture rough-in piping systems in our shops. The fixtures would subsequently be shipped to the project on a just-in-time basis.

The prefabrication process consisted of 60,000 pounds of ductwork and 2,500 feet of waste and vent, and domestic water piping. Modular restroom assemblies were prefabbed for 161 fixtures. Twenty-one batteries were shipped to the project, rolled in to place, and finish piped in four weeks.

Bruner met our commitment to our customer with the detailed planning and coordination between our fab shop and field teams.

Thanks to all those who made this project a tremendous success.

NCH RBIII Nears End of Plumbing, Med-Gas Line Installation

Nationwide Children’s Research Building III is nearing the end of the installation of the building’s plumbing and medical gas lines after almost two years of field installation work.  The seven-story building is roughed in and final connections to medical outlets, building equipment and fixtures will be made throughout the next 30 days.

Nearly 15,000 linear feet of medical gas copper pipe serve the wet labs on levels four and six, distributing carbon dioxide, oxygen, medical air, and lab gas.  Over 17,000 linear feet of domestic water copper pipe has been installed, with more than half of that being located in the lower level vivarium. These lines feed the faucets, drinking fountains, emergency shower and eyewash stations throughout the building. The lower level vivarium also required a specialized drinking water distribution system specifically designed for small and mid-sized animals. These 2,600 linear feet of fire rated plastic pipe were brought in from a design and manufacturing company based out of California to supply clean water to over 200 distribution stations.

Currently, Bruner is working in conjunction with other final trades companies to ensure all sinks, faucets, eyewashes, and bathroom fixtures are set properly. Final items to be completed by other trades include installation of cabinetry, floor tile, drywall, and ceilings; painting; and installation of lab-specific structures to house medical gas lines.

Life Safety for the building is set for February 6, 2012, meaning that all plumbing work must be completed and inspected by that time.

 

OSU Tunnel Project Nears Completion of Main Piping Systems

Bruner’s work as on the Ohio State University Medical Center Tunnel project began mid-2010. As we near the end of 2011, Bruner’s team is working hard to meet deadlines, complete tasks, and prepare for next year’s challenges.

At its inception, the project involved a utility tunnel relocation providing high pressure steam and chilled water to OSU Medical Center’s new Cancer Critical Tower, along with distribution to other main hospitals on the Medical Center campus. Feature of the project include:

  • Chilled Water Piping
    • 1,600 lineal feet of 36” extra heavy carbon steel piping
    • 900 lineal feet of 42” extra heavy carbon steel piping
    • 500 lineal feet of 24” preinsulated underground piping
  • High Pressure Steam and Condensate Piping
    • 1,000 lineal feet of 12” seamless carbon steel piping
    • 1,500 lineal feet of 8” and 6” stainless steel piping

The goal of the mechanical upgrade was to result in greater efficiencies and savings in operational costs and energy in adjacent Medical Center buildings.

As we sit here today, the main piping systems for chilled water (CHW), high pressure steam (HPS), and pumped condensate return (PCR) for all remaining sequences in the Tunnel project are nearing completion. The Bruner team is also preparing for hydrotesting of the CHW piping, which will begin in mid-to-late January 2012. In the following four weeks, crews will focus on small bore piping and specialties as they prepare for the steam blow operation to begin in May 2012.

Advantages of Prefabrication Date Back to Ancient Times

The process of prefabrication has been around since ancient times. It is believed that as early as the 3800s BC a roadway known as the “Sweet Track” was built in Somerset Levels, England, using prefabricated sections of Ash, Oak and Lime trees. Today, prefabrication is used in engineering across many disciplines, including mechanical and civil engineering.

At Bruner, we often prefabricate materials at our location in Hilliard, Ohio, prior to delivering them to any given job site. To learn more about the advantages of prefabrication, watch the video below.

A Brief Look into the History of BIM Technology

Building information modeling (BIM) made its debut in the AEC industry in 1987 in software company Graphisoft’s ArchiCAD program under a different name – virtual building. Building industry strategist Phil Bernstein was the first to use the actual term “BIM” while working for Autodesk, an American multinational corporation that focuses on 3D design software.

AEC industry analyst Jerry Laiserin helped popularize and standardize the term BIM as a common name for the digital representation of the building process. Laiserin argued, “‘building information modeling,’ as a description of the next generation of design software, seems to me to come closer to the winning characteristics evidenced by ‘CAD’ for its generation of tools—specific enough to evoke reasonably clear, common meanings, yet broad enough to encompass a diversity of commercial and technological approaches. The only fly in the ointment is that Autodesk has been using the term for the last few months to describe their building industry strategy.” Before deciding upon the name “BIM,” other possibilities included: single building model, virtual building model, integrated project modeling, and project lifecycle management.

Today, BIM technology can be found in the AEC industry across the world. In Canada, the Institute for BIM in Canada (IBC) is responsible for leading and facilitating all of the coordinated use of BIM technology in the Canadian construction environment. In the UK, the Construction Project Information Committee is, “responsible for providing best practice guidance on the content, form and preparation of construction production information, and making sure this best practice is disseminated throughout the UK construction industry.” As a committee, they proposed a definition of Building Information Modeling for adoption throughout the UK construction industry. Several groups – including the FFB ((Fédération française du bâtiment) and the French branch of buildingSMART – are pushing for a more integrated adoption of BIM standards in France.

BIM is still relatively new technology in an industry typically slow to adopt change. Early adopters of the technology, though, are confident in BIM’s growth potential.